Antigonish RCMP apprehend two more Impaired Drivers

Posted on August 31, 2015

A 47 year old Halifax County man was arrested for impaired driving early Thursday after he was stopped by police on in local business parking lot. He was escorted to the RCMP detachment to provide samples of his breath. He faces charges of impaired driving and operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration over 80 mgs/100 ml of blood. He will appear in court on November 18, 2015.

A 40 year old Antigonish County man was arrested for impaired driving early Friday evening after he was stopped by police while driving an All Terrain Vehicle in Monastery. He was escorted to the RCMP detachment to provide samples of his breath. He faces charges of impaired driving and operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration over 80 mgs/100 ml of blood. He will appear in court on October 21, 2015.

Five criminal code driving charges were laid in Antigonish County throughout August. Four for impaired driving and one driving while prohibited.

B.J.(Brian) Rehill, Sgt
Operations NCO
Antigonish District
(902)-863-6500
(902)-863-5570 fax

Antigonish RCMP apprehend Impaired Driver over the weekend

Posted on August 24, 2015

A 24 year old Colchester County man was arrested for impaired driving early Saturday morning after he was stopped by police on Braemore Avenue. He was escorted to the RCMP detachment to provide samples of his breath. He faces charges of impaired driving and operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration over 80 mgs/100 ml of blood. He will appear in court on October 21st, 2015.

B.J.(Brian) Rehill, Sgt
Operations NCO
Antigonish District
(902)-863-6500
(902)-863-5570 fax

School Bus Safety

Posted on August 21, 2015

• When you get off the bus, take “10 giant steps” along the shoulder of the road, then stop and look at the bus driver. The driver will signal when it is safe to cross.
• When the driver signals, walk straight across the road in front of the bus, and then stop at the outer edge of the bus. Look both ways, and if no vehicles are approaching, continue across the road.

Throughout the month of September, the Nova Scotia RCMP Traffic Services Unit will be patrolling school zones across the province to educate motorists and enforce Motor Vehicle Act regulations. Below is a chart listing MVA violations and their applicable fines.

Motor Vehicle Act Violation Fine Amount
103(2A)(a) – Exceeding speed limit by between 1 and 15 km/h, inclusive, in school area First offence – $352.50
Second offence – $582.50
Third or subsequent offence – $1,042.50
103(2A)(b) – Exceeding speed limit by between 16 and 30 km/h, inclusive, in school area First offence – $467.50
Second offence – $812.50
Third or subsequent offence – $1,502.50
103(2A)(c ) – Exceeding speed limit by 31 km/h or more in school area First offence – $697.50
Second offence – $1,272.50
Third or subsequent offence – $2,422.50
Section 103(3) – Failing to stop for stopped school bus exhibiting flashing red lights
First offence – $410.00
Second offence – $697.50
Third or subsequent offence – $1,272.50
103(4) – Failing to proceed with caution when passing school bus exhibiting flashing amber lights
First offence – $295.00
Second offence – $467.50
Third or subsequent offence – $812.50

For more information on school bus safety, visit http://schoolbussafety.ca/

Impaired driving enforcement and education the focus for RCMP in August

Posted on August 17, 2015

During the month of August, Nova Scotia RCMP continue to focus their enforcement and education efforts on impaired driving.

For the first six months of 2015, Nova Scotia RCMP officers charged 478 motorists for impaired driving, with 47 of those charges being Impaired by Drug. In 2014, officers charged 1023 motorists for being Impaired by Alcohol and 84 for being Impaired by Drug.

“Impaired driving is never acceptable, and our officers continue to patrol Nova Scotia roadways to ensure that the public is safe” says Nova Scotia RCMP Cst. Mark Skinner.

“Luckily, we’re off to a positive start this month, as there have not been any impaired driving crashes involving serious injury or death so far.”

Illicit drugs and many prescription medications can also cause impairment, and in some cases, small amounts of alcohol combined with these drugs can create a much higher level of impairment than alcohol or drugs alone. At the end of the day, however, any type of impaired driving creates a dangerous situation that can and does have tragic consequences.

The RCMP reminds Nova Scotians that consuming alcohol or drugs while operating any motorized vehicle (including a boat or all-terrain vehicle) is considered impaired driving, and the fines and penalties are the same as operating a road vehicle while impaired.

If you witness a suspected impaired driver, call police as soon as it is safe to do so. You will be asked to provide as many details about the vehicle, the driver, and the overall driving behaviour as possible.

Below are some of the tell-tale signs of an impaired driver:

• Driving unreasonably fast, slow or at an inconsistent speed
• Drifting in and out of lanes
• Making exceptionally wide turns
• Overshooting or stopping well before stop signs or stop lights
• Disregarding traffic signals and lights
• Driving without headlights, failing to lower high beams or leaving turn signals on
• Driving with windows open in inclement weather

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